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St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
Jun. 5, 12:30 pm  -  External Solemnity the Sacred Heart
Missa Susana un jour, Claudio Merulo (1533 – 1604)
Improperium, Robert Kruetz (1922 – 1996)
Tollite jugum meum, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)

Silent Film: “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”

Silent Film of 1916 accompanied by Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ

Details:
Jun. 4, 6:00 pm  -  Featuring Capt Nemo and friends
Schedule




5 pm - Doors Open
6 pm - Show Begins

Tickets




$10 - General Admission
$5 - Kids 12 and under

St. Cecilia Choir sings 11 am Mass (Extraordinary Form)

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form and Eucharistic Procession

Details:
May. 29, 11:00 am  -  Solemnity of Corpus Christi, External Solemnity
MUSICAL REPERTOIRE:

Missa Dixit Joseph, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Lauda Sion, Chant
Respexit Elias, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
O Sacrum Convivium, Cristóbal de Morales (1500 – 1553)

PLEASE NOTE:

1) The 11:00 am Mass will be offered according to the 1962 Missale Romanum (Extraordinary Form)
2) The 11:00 am Mass (Latin High Mass) will be followed by a Eucharistic Procession. If weather permits, the procession will go outside.
3) There is no 12:30 pm Mass on this date.

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
May. 15, 12:30 pm  -  Solemnity of Pentecost
Messe Solenelle pour Pentecote, Emile Paladihle (1844 – 1926)
Repleti sunt omnes, Jacob Handl (1550 – 1591)
Confirma hoc, Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 10:30 am Mass

Solemnity of Pentecost

Details:
May. 15, 10:30 am  -  Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form
Messe Solenelle pour Pentecote, Emile Paladihle (1844 – 1926)
Repleti sunt omnes, Jacob Handl (1550 – 1591)
Confirma hoc, Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825)

Concert: Schola Antiqua

Details:
May. 14, 7:30 pm
Tickets




TBA




Repertoire




TBA




Audio Preview of Schola Antiqua




St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
May. 8, 12:30 pm  -  Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord, External Solemnity
Missa Quando lieta sperei, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)
Ascendo Patrem Meum, Blasius Amon (1558 – 1590)
Ascendit Deus, Peter Philips (1560 – 1628)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 11 am Mass

Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form

Details:
May. 8, 11:00 am  -  Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord, Transferred
Missa Quando lieta sperei, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)
Ascendo Patrem Meum, Blasius Amon (1558 – 1590)
Ascendit Deus, Peter Philips (1560 – 1628)

William Schlueter, Organ Recital

Details:
May. 1, 3:00 pm
2 pm - Luncheon (served in the Cafe San Giovanni - lower level)
3 pm - Concert (church)

Widor- Allegro from Symphony #6
Vierne- Scherzo from Symphony #2
Denis Bedard- Variations on Old Hundreth
Bach- either Toccata Adagio and Fugue (BWV 564) or Trio Sonata #6
Dupre- Prelude and Fugue in B Major, Op. 7.
Franck- Cantabile
Boellman- Toccata from Suite Gothique, OR Richard Purvis- Toccata Festiva

Resurrection Choir and Orchestra sing for 12:30 pm High Mass

Feast of St. Joseph the Worker

Details:
May. 1, 12:30 pm  -  Resurrection Choir and Orchestra
Missa Solemnis (K 337, “Missa Aulica”), Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Benedicam Dominum, Michael Haydn (1737–1806)
Te Deum, Baldassare Galuppi (1706 –1785)
Laetatus sum, Michael Haydn (1737–1806)


Gargoyle Brass Concert

Details:
Apr. 30, 7:30 pm  - 
TBA

Organ Recital Corrado Cavalli

Details:
Apr. 24, 3:00 pm
Concert Repertoire

Marche Heroique, Edwin Henry Lemare 1865 - 1934
Sonata No. 1 in g minor, Op. 40, René-Louis Becker 1882 - 1956
Praeludium Festivum - Dialogue - Scherzo - Prayer - Toccata, René-Louis Becker 1882 - 1956
Scherzo in D, Filippo Capocci 1840 - 1911
Ofertorio, Jesu Guridi 1886 - 1961
2 Pieces for Organ, Healey Willan 1880 - 1968
Madrigal, Dezső Antalffy-Zsiross 1885 - 1945
Finale from Concerto Gregoriano, Pietro Alessandro Yon 1886 - 1943

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

4th Sunday after Easter

Details:
Apr. 24, 12:30 pm  -  Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form
Missa Ad coenam Agni providi, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525 – 1594)
Alleluia, Laudem dicite, Orazio Vecchi (1550 – 1605)
Haec Dies, Luigi Molfino (1916 – 2012)

Resurrection Choir and Orchestra sing for 12:30 pm High Mass

Details:
Apr. 17, 12:30 pm
Missa Solemnis C minor (K 139, “Waisenhausmesse”), Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Haec Dies, ZWV 169, Jan Dismas Zelenka
Regina Caeli, K 276, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart





The Genius of Handel

Featuring the St. Cecilia Choir with Chamber Ensemble

Details:
Apr. 16, 6:30 pm  -  Under the Direction of Daniel V. Robinson
... But Handel’s harmony affects the soul,
To sooth by sweetness, or by force controul;
And with like sounds as tune the rolling spheres,
So tunes the mind, that ev’ry sense has ears.
When jaundice jealousy, and carking care,
Or tyrant pride, or homicide despair,
The soul as on a rack in torture keep,
Those monsters Handel’s music lulls to sleep.
- An anonymous poem in The Gentleman's Magazine (May 1740)

CONCERT REPERTOIRE




Dixit Dominus, George Frederick Handel
TBA





About the Composer




Synopsis

Baroque composer George Handel was born February 23, 1685, in Halle, Germany. In 1704 Handel made his debut as an opera composer with Almira. He produced several operas with the Royal Academy of Music before forming the New Royal Academy of Music in 1727. When Italian operas fell out of fashion, he started composing oratorios, including Messiah. George Handel died April 14, 1759, in London, England.

Early Life

Baroque composer George Handel was born George Frederick Handel on February 23, 1685, to Georg and Dorothea Handel of Halle, Saxony, Germany. From an early age, Handel longed to study music, but his father objected, doubting that music was a realistic source of income. In fact, his father would not even permit him to own a musical instrument. His mother was, however, supportive, and encouraged him to develop his musical talent. With her cooperation, Handel took to practicing on the sly.

When Handel was seven years old, he had the opportunity to play the organ for the duke’s court in Weissenfels. It was there that Handel met composer and organist Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow. Zachow was impressed with Handel’s potential, and invited Handel to become his pupil. Under the tutelage of Zachow, Handel mastered composing for the organ, the oboe and the violin alike by the time he was 10 years old. From the age of 11 to the time he was 16 or 17 years old, Handel composed church cantatas and chamber music that, being written for a small audience, failed to garner much attention and have since been lost to time.

Despite his dedication to his music, at his father’s insistence, Handel initially agreed to study law. Not surprisingly, he did not remain enrolled in law courses for long. His passion for music would not be suppressed.

In 1703, when Handel was 18 years old, he decided to pursue music in full force, by accepting a violinist’s position at the Hamburg Opera’s Goosemarket Theater. During this time, he supplemented his income by teaching private music lessons in his free time, passing on what he had learned from his own mentor, Zachow.

Opera

While working as a violinist, Handel ironically earned attention for his skill on the organ. In fact, it was Handel’s organ playing that landed him more opportunities to perform in operas.

In 1704 Handel made his debut as an opera composer, writing his very first opera, Almira. The opera was successful and achieved a 20-performance run. After composing several more successful operas, in 1706 Handel decided to try his hand in Italy. While in Italy, Handel composed the operas Rodrigo and Agrippina, which were produced in 1707 and 1709 respectively. He also managed to write more than a few dramatic chamber works during his trip to Italy.

Touring the major Italian cities over three opera seasons, Handel introduced himself to most of Italy’s major musicians. Unexpectedly, while in Venice, he met multiple people who expressed an interest in London’s music scene. Enticed to experiment with a freelance music career there, Handel left Venice and set out for London. In London, Handel met with the manager of the King’s Theatre. The manager gladly agreed to let Handel write an opera for the theater. Within just two weeks, Handel composed Rinaldo. Released during the 1710–1711 London opera season, Rinaldo was Handel’s breakthrough work. His most critically acclaimed work up to that date, it gained him the widespread recognition he would maintain throughout the rest of his musical career.

After Handel released Rinaldo, he spent the next few years writing and performing for English royalty, including Queen Anne and King George I. In 1719, Handel was invited to become the Master of the Orchestra at the Royal Academy of Music, the first Italian opera company in London. Handel eagerly accepted. He produced several operas with the Royal Academy of Music that, while well liked, were not especially lucrative for the struggling academy.

In 1726 Handel decided to make London his home permanently, and became a British citizen. In 1727, when Handel’s latest opera, Alessandro, was being performed, Italian opera in London took a hard hit as a result of a hostile rivalry between two female lead singers. Frustrated, Handel broke away from the Royal Academy and formed his own new company, calling it the New Royal Academy of Music. Under the New Royal Academy of Music, Handel produced two operas a year for the next decade, but Italian opera fell increasingly out of style in London. Handel composed two more Italian operas before he decided to abandon the failing genre.

Oratorios

In place of operas, oratorios became Handel’s new format of choice. Oratorios, large-scale concert pieces, immediately caught on with audiences and proved quite lucrative. The fact that oratorios didn’t require elaborate costumes and sets, as operas did, also meant that they cost far less to produce. Handel revised a number of Italian operas to fit the new format, translating them into English for the London audience. Handel’s oratorios became the latest craze in London and were soon made a regular feature of the opera season.

In 1735, during Lent alone, Handel produced over 14 concerts made up primarily of oratorios. In 1741 Dublin’s Lord Lieutenant commissioned Handel to write a new oratorio based on a biblical libretto assembled by art patron Charles Jennens. As a result, Handel’s most famous oratorio, Messiah, made its debut at the New Music Hall in Dublin in April 1742.

Back in London, Handel organized a subscription season for 1743 that consisted exclusively of oratorios. The series opened with Handel’s composition Samson, to audience acclaim. Samson was eventually followed by a run of Handel’s beloved Messiah.

Handel continued to compose a long string of oratorios throughout the remainder of his life and career. These included: Semele (1744), Joseph and his Brethren (1744), Hercules (1745), Belshazzar (1745), Occasional Oratorio (1746), Judas Maccabeus (1747), Joshua (1748), Alexander Balus (1748), Susanna (1749), Solomon (1749), Theodora (1750), The Choice of Hercules (1751), Jeptha (1752) and The Triumph of Time and Truth (1757).

In addition to his oratorios, Handel’s concerti grossi, anthems and orchestral pieces also garnered him fame and success. Among the most noted were Water Music (1717), Coronation Anthems (1727), Trio Sonatas op. 2 (1722–1733), Trio Sonatas op. 5 (1739), Concerto Grosso op. 6 (1739) and Music for Royal Fireworks, completed a decade before his death.

Health Issues

Over the course of his musical career, Handel, exhausted by stress, endured a number of potentially debilitating problems with his physical health. He is also believed to have suffered from anxiety and depression. Yet somehow, Handel, who was known to laugh in the face of adversity, remained virtually undeterred in his determination to keep making music.

In the spring of 1737, Handel had a stroke that impaired the movement of his right hand. His fans worried that he would never compose again. But after only six weeks of recuperation in Aix-la-Chapelle, Handel was fully recovered. He went back to London and not only returned to composing, but made a comeback at playing the organ as well.

Six years later, Handel suffered a second springtime stroke. He stunned audiences once again with a speedy recovery, followed by a prolific stream of ambitious oratorios.

Handel’s three-act oratorio Samson, which premiered in London in 1743, reflected how Handel related to the character’s blindness through his own firsthand experience with the progressive degeneration of his sight:

Total eclipse! no sun, no moon. All dark amidst the blaze of noon. Oh glorious light! no cheering ray To glad my eyes with welcome day.
By 1750, Handel had entirely lost the sight in his left eye. He forged on, composing the oratorio Jephtha, which also contained a reference to obscured vision. In 1752 Handel lost sight in his other eye and was rendered completely blind. As always before, Handel’s passionate pursuit of music propelled him forward. He kept on performing and composing. Handel relied on his sharp memory to compensate when necessary, and remained actively involved in productions of his work until his dying day.

Death and Legacy


On April 14, 1759, George Handel died in bed at his rented house at 25 Brook Street, in the Mayfair district of London. The Baroque composer and organist was 74 years old.

Handel was known for being a generous man, even in death. His will divided his assets among his servants and several charities, including the Foundling Hospital. He even donated the money to pay for his own funeral so that none of his loved ones would bear the financial burden. Handel was buried in Westminster Abbey a week after he died. Following his death, biographical documents began to circulate, and George Handel soon took on legendary status posthumously.

During his lifetime, Handel composed nearly 30 oratorios and close to 50 operas. At least 30 of those operas were written for the Royal Academy of Music, London’s very first Italian opera company. He was also a prolific writer of orchestral pieces and concerti grossi. He is said to have made significant contributions to all of the musical genres of his generation. His most renowned work is the oratorio Messiah, written in 1741 and first performed in Dublin in 1742.

In 1784, 25 years after Handel’s death, three commemorative concerts were held in his honor at the Parthenon and Westminster Abbey. In 2001 Handel’s home on Brook Street (from 1723 to 1759) became the site of the Handel House Museum, established in memory of his legendary life and works.

Silent Film Presentation - “The Kid” (1921)

Featuring Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan

Details:
Apr. 10, 3:00 pm  - 
Schedule




2:00 p.m. Doors Open
3:00 p.m. Show Begins

Tickets




$10 - General Admission
$5 - Kids 12 and under

About the Film




The Kid is a 1921 American silent comedy-drama film written by, produced by, directed by, and starring Charlie Chaplin, and features Jackie Coogan as his adopted son and sidekick. This was Chaplin's first full-length film as a director (he had been a co-star in 1914's Tillie's Punctured Romance). It was a huge success, and was the second-highest grossing film in 1921, behind The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. In 2011, The Kid was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." Daring in its combination of comedic and dramatic elements, The Kid is widely considered one of the greatest films of the silent era.

Movie Plot




An unwed woman (Edna Purviance) leaves a charity hospital carrying her newborn son. An artist (Carl Miller), the apparent father, is shown with the woman's photograph. When it falls into the fireplace, he first picks it up, then throws it back in to burn up. The woman decides to abandon her child in the back seat of an expensive automobile with a handwritten note imploring the finder to care for and love the baby. However, the car is stolen. When the two thieves discover the child, they leave him on the street. A tramp (Charlie Chaplin) finds the baby. Unwilling at first to take on the responsibility, he eventually softens and names the boy John. Elsewhere, the woman has an apparent change of heart and returns for the baby, but is heartbroken and faints upon learning of the baby being taken away.

Five years passed, and the child (Jackie Coogan) becomes the Tramp's partner in minor crime, throwing stones to break windows that the Tramp, working as a glazier, can then repair. Meanwhile, the woman becomes a wealthy star. She does charity work among the poor to fill the void of her missing child. By chance, the mother and child cross paths, but do not recognize each other. When the boy becomes sick, a doctor comes to see him. He discovers that the Tramp is not the boy's father. The Tramp shows him the note left by the mother, but the doctor merely takes it and notifies the authorities. Two men come to take the boy to an orphanage, but after a fight and a chase, the Tramp regains his boy. When the woman comes back to see how the boy is doing, the doctor tells her what has happened, then shows her the note, which she recognizes.

Now fugitives, the Tramp and the boy spend the night in a flophouse, but the manager (Bergman), having read of the $1000 reward (in 2015 figures, roughly $13,300) offered for the child, takes him to the police station to be united with his ecstatic mother. When the Tramp wakes up, he searches frantically for the missing boy, then returns to doze beside the now-locked doorway to their humble home. In his sleep, he enters "Dreamland," with angels in residence and devilish interlopers. He is awakened by a policeman, who places the Tramp in a car and rides with him to a house. When the door opens, the woman and John emerge, reuniting the elated adoptive father and son. The policeman, who is happy for the family, shakes the Tramp's hand and leaves, before the woman welcomes the Tramp into her home.

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

2nd Sunday after Easter

Details:
Apr. 10, 12:30 pm  -  Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form
Missa Ancor col che partire, Jacquet of Mantua (1483 – 1559)
Ego sum pastor bonus, Wacław z Szamotuł (1520 – 1560)
Surrexit pastor bonus, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
Apr. 3, 12:30 pm  -  Quasimodo Sunday
Missa Prima sexti toni, Giovanni Croce (1557 – 1609)
Angelus Domini, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525 – 1594)
Quia vidisti Me, Jacob Handl (1550 – 1591)

Resurrection Choir and Orchestra sing for 12:30 pm High Mass

Solemnity of the Resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Details:
Mar. 27, 12:30 pm
Missa Solemnis in C major (Dominicusmesse), KV 66, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Terra Tremuit, Joseph von Eybler
Pascha nostrum, M. Haydn, Arr. By Rev. Scott A. Haynes, SJC
Hallelujah (from the 'Mount of Olives'), Ludwig van Beethoven





St. Cecilia Choir sings 10:30 am Mass

Solemnity of the Resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Details:
Mar. 27, 10:30 am  -  Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form
Messe pour Pasques, Marc-Antoine Charpentier (1643 – 1704)
Et respicientes, Luca Marenzio (1553 – 1599)
Gaudeamus omnium, Philippe de Verdelot (1475 – 1552)

Easter Vigil Mass at 10 pm

Easter Vigil

Details:
Mar. 26, 10:00 pm  -  Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form
Missa Paschale, Ludwig Senfl (1486 – 1543)
Dextera Domini, César Franck (1822 – 1890)
Congratulamini mihi omnes, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)

Liturgy of Good Friday at 3:00 pm

Details:
Mar. 25, 3:00 pm  -  Liturgical Service of Good Friday
St. John Passion, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Timor et tremor, Francis Poulenc (1899 – 1963)
Improperia, Tomás Luis de Victoria, (c. 1548 – 1611)
Crux Fidelis, Domenico Bartolucci (1917 – 2013)
Miserere, James MacMillan (b. 1959)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 7:00 pm Mass, Holy Thursday

Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form

Details:
Mar. 24, 7:00 pm  -  Holy (Maundy) Thursday
Missa in Eb, “Cantus Missa”, Josef Gabriel Rheinberger (1839 – 1901)
Ubi caritas, Imant Raminsh (b. 1943)
Fratres: Scitote, Cipriano de Rore (1515 – 1565)

Tenebrae for Spy Wednesday, 7:30 pm, St. Cecilia Choir

Spy Wednesday of Holy Week

Details:
Mar. 23, 7:30 pm  -  Choral Tenebrae Service
Responsoria, Francisco Martins, (1620 – 1680)
Benedictus, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Christus Factus est, Juan Bautista Comes (1582 – 1643)
Miserere, Gregorio Allegri (1582 – 1652)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 9:30 am Mass

Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form with Palm Sunday Procession

Details:
Mar. 20, 9:30 am  -  Palm Sunday
Ingrediente Domino, George Malcolm (1917 – 1997)
St. Luke Passion, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Missa Osculetur me à 8, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Improperium exspectavit, Russell Woollen (1923 – 1994)
Defecit in delore, William Byrd (1540 – 1623)

St. Joseph Table

Details:
Mar. 19, 6:00 pm
St. Josephcome Honor St. Joseph at our St. Joseph’s Table on Saturday, March 19, 2016 after the 5pm Mass in the Church Hall.

The Litany to St. Joseph will be sung after Mass and there will be a procession to the Church Hall for the blessing of the Table. There will be a Consecration and Salutations to St. Joseph along with some traditional reenactments of Italian traditions.

Please plan on joining us and invite family and friends to honor this Great Saint, the Foster Father of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Donations of desserts and bottles of wine, red or white would be greatly appreciated.

All free will donations will be given to the Little Sisters of the Poor


Last year was a huge success with hundreds of parishioners, family and friends coming to honor the 'Foster-Father of Our Lord.' We had devotions, a grand meal, delicious desserts, and Italian traditions.Don't miss it this year!


cantius
View photos of Last Year's Saint Joseph Table

Concert of Sergio Orabona, Organist

Details:
Mar. 13, 3:00 pm
2:00 pm Lunch (Cafe San Giovanni, Church Hall, Lower Level)
3:00 pm Concert (Church)

Program

Louis Vierne (1870 - 1937)
Allegro from Symphonie no. 2 op. 20

Marco Enrico Bossi (1861 - 1925)
Scherzo in sol minore op. 49 n. 2

Sir Georg Thalben Ball (1896 - 1987)
Elegy

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Prelude and fugue in a minor BWV 543

Henri Mulet (1878 - 1967)
from Esquisses byzantines: Tu es Petra

Charles-Marie Widor (1844 - 1937)
Allegro cantabile from Symphonie no. 5 op. 42

Marcel Dupré (1886 - 1971)
Prelude and fugue in B major op. 7 no. 1

Biography

Sergio Orabona was born in 1978 in Naples. Following in his parents’ footsteps, he studied music at a very young age. In 1998 he graduated in Organ and Composition with highest honors under the guidance of Maestro Vincenzo De Gregorio. He then continued his studies with Arturo Sacchetti , Daniel Roth, Harald Vogel, and at the Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music in Rome with Giancarlo Parodi . In 2000 he obtained diplomas in Piano and Choral music and Choral conducting .

In 1994 he recorded a CD published by the “Terzo Millennio” record label and he dedicated it to the author of the Neapolitan School of Pipe Organ Thomas De Martino (1750), based in Naples’ Cathedral. From 1995 to 2001 he was organist at the Naples Cathedral and at the Anglican Church of Naples. As an International concert organist, he performed in the most important cathedrals in Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Poland, Switzerland, Luxenburg, Principality of Monaco, Usa and Canada. He has also made ​​radio recordings , including previously unreleased tracks by Francesco Durante, Giovanni Fumo and Carlo Cotumacci for the Bavarian Radio.

Since 2012 he is organist at St. Nikolaus Kirche in Stuttgart, and artistic director of the “Internationales Stuttgarter Orgelfestival” . He is also a member of the Organ Association “Giovanni Maria Trabaci”.

Men’s Annual Lenten Retreat

Come and deepen your relationship with Christ!

Details:
Mar. 12, 9:45 am
The Knights of Columbus Lafayette Council #361 is sponsoring Lenten Retreats for both Men and Women at St. John Cantius Parish at 825 N Carpenter St., Chicago IL.

Download and print out March 12th Men's Registration Form (PDF) »

The Men's retreat will be held on Saturday, March 12. The retreat includes Mass, Conferences, Confessions and a Meal. Come and deepen your relationship with Christ! The retreat master will be Fr. Nathan Caswell SJC.

The minimum suggested donation is $30 and includes lunch. You don't need to be enrolled in the Knights of Columbus to attend.
For more information call Thomas Diez at 773-852-1936 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Checks should be made out to Lafayette Council #361 and can be mailed to:

    F.S. Thomas Diez

    PO Box 2204

    Des Plaines, IL 60017-2204



SCHEDULE



      9:45 a.m. — Check-in (Church Hall)

      10 a.m. — First Conference (Church Hall)

      10:45 a.m. — Confessions (Church)

      11:30 a.m. — Holy Mass & Homily (Church)

      12:30 p.m. — Lunch (Church Hall)

      1:30 p.m. — Second Conference (Church Hall)

      2:15 p.m. — Stations of the Cross/Private Prayer/Confessions (Church)

      3 p.m. — Third Conference (Church Hall)

      3:45 p.m. — Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction (Church)



Cantate Domino Choir sings Pergolesi’s “Stabat Mater” at Stations of the Cross

Cantate Domino Choir and String Ensemble

Details:
Mar. 11, 7:30 pm  -  Stations of the Cross
Pergolesi: Stabat mater

Tournemire’s “L’Orgue Mystique” with Organist Richard Spotts

Details:
Mar. 6, 3:00 pm


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Charles Tournemire



Charles Tournemire (1870-1939), the renowned organist titulaire of Sainte-Clotilde in Paris, was a prolific composer and an improviser extraordinaire whose greatest chef-d'œuvre was his magnum opus, L'Orgue Mystique. Written between 1927-1932, L'Orgue Mystique is a two-hundred-fifty-three movement cycle of liturgical pieces based upon over three-hundred Gregorian Chants. This musical monument transformed the sound of the organ world, welcoming organ music into modernity while vesting it in the eternal musical heritage of the Church. Although cited by scholars as a pivotal point in ecclesiastical music, L'Orgue Mystique is shrouded in popular obscurity due to the dark cloud which enveloped Europe at the time along with Tournemire's sudden passing during the chaotic onset of World War II.

Richard Spotts



Organist, Richard Spotts, a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania and a graduate of Westminster Choir College here in Princeton, has set out to perform and educate the public of this seminal work, with the ultimate goal of performing the complete fifteen hour cycle in a recital series over a period of ten days. This project has taken him parishes and cathedrals far afield such as the Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Denver, Trinity Copley Square in Boston, and the National Cathedral in Washington, DC in addition to churches in Atlanta, Miami, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Toronto, and Québec City. So far Mr. Spotts has given over sixty recitals involving fifty institutions in the United States and Canada and he is now in the process of writing a book on the subject.

Mr. Spotts' recital features movements from Charles Tournemire seminal work, L'Orgue Mystique. Although today Tournemire is shrouded in popular obscurity, Tournemire was one of the greatest organists of his day with his mystical organ style directly influencing the works of Olivier Messiaen, Ermend-Bonnal, Joseph Bonnet, Jean-Yves Daniel-Lesur, Jehan Alain, Maurice Duruflé and Jean Langlais. Born in Bordeaux in 1870, Tournemire, who was a student of César Franck and Charles Marie Widor, became organist of Sainte-Clotilde in 1898, a post Tournemire retained until his death in 1939.



Click here to learn more about our Casavant Organ (op. 1130), nicknamed "Tina Mae."

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Details:
Mar. 6, 12:30 pm  -  4th Sunday of Lent (Laetare)
Messe in D, Antonin Dvorak (1841 – 1904)
Laudate Dominum, Francesco Bianciardi (1570 – 1607)
Crux Fidelis, Jean Jules Amabile Roger-Ducasse (1873 – 1954)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 11 am Mass

Details:
Mar. 6, 11:00 am  -  4th Sunday of Lent (Laetare)
Messe in D, Antonin Dvorak (1841 – 1904)
Laudate Dominum, Francesco Bianciardi (1570 – 1607)
Crux Fidelis, Jean Jules Amabile Roger-Ducasse (1873 – 1954)


Organ Music at 9 am Mass

Organist Corrado Cavalli

Details:
Mar. 6, 9:00 am
Prelude and fugue in b BWV 544, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)

Women’s Annual Lenten Retreat

Come and deepen your relationship with Christ!

Details:
Mar. 5, 9:45 am
The Knights of Columbus Lafayette Council #361 is sponsoring Lenten Retreats for both Men and Women at St. John Cantius Parish at 825 N Carpenter St., Chicago IL.

Download and print out March 5th Women's Registration Form (PDF) »

The Women's retreat will be held on Saturday, March 5. The retreat includes Mass, Conferences, Confessions and a Meal. Come and deepen your relationship with Christ! The retreat master will be Fr. Nathan Caswell SJC.

The minimum suggested donation is $30 and includes lunch. You don't need to be enrolled in the Knights of Columbus to attend.
For more information call Thomas Diez at 773-852-1936 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Checks should be made out to Lafayette Council #361 and can be mailed to:

    F.S. Thomas Diez

    PO Box 2204

    Des Plaines, IL 60017-2204



SCHEDULE



      9:45 a.m. — Check-in (Church Hall)

      10 a.m. — First Conference (Church Hall)

      10:45 a.m. — Confessions (Church)

      11:30 a.m. — Holy Mass & Homily (Church)

      12:30 p.m. — Lunch (Church Hall)

      1:30 p.m. — Second Conference (Church Hall)

      2:15 p.m. — Stations of the Cross/Private Prayer/Confessions (Church)

      3 p.m. — Third Conference (Church Hall)

      3:45 p.m. — Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction (Church)



Cantate Domino Choir sings for 7:30 pm Mass (Ash Wednesday)

Details:
Feb. 10, 7:30 pm  -  Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form
Messe Brève, Léo Delibes (1836-1891)
Venite ad me omnes, Luigi Cervi
Ave Regina Caelorum, Op. 171, No. 6, Josef Gabriel Rheinberger (1839-1901)
De Profundis, Andreas Hammerschmidt (1611-1675)
Benedicimus Deum caeli, Orazio Tarditi (1602-1677)






Organ Music for 12:30 pm Mass

Organist Corrado Cavalli

Details:
Feb. 7, 12:30 pm
Andantino, César Franck (1822 – 1990)
O Welt, ich muss dich lassen, Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)

Resurrection Choir and Orchestra sing for the 11 am Mass

Details:
Feb. 7, 11:00 am
Music for Choir and Orchestra

Missa Brevis in C (K. 259, “Orgel-Solo Messe”), Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
A Prayer for Guidance, Nicholas White
Confitebor, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
In the Name of God we will set up our Banners, Healey Willan
Alleluia! Song of Gladness, Arr. Rev. Scott A. Haynes, SJC





Organ Music

Elevazione, Vincenzo Petrali (1830 – 1889)
Introduction, Organ Sonata No. 2, Op. 87, Edward Elgar (1857 – 1934)