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Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Oct. 10, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Sep. 12, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Aug. 15, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

Workshop in Illumination: Our Lady of Guadalupe

Catholic Art Guild

Details:
Jul. 24, 9:00 am
Medieval Illumination of Our Lady of Guadalupe
One Week Intensive Workshop
July 24-July 29, 2017
9:00 am -5:00 pm Monday-Saturday

Details: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-in-illumination-our-lady-of-guadalupe-tickets-44388817147

Canory Building (The building behind St. John Cantius Rectory)

Come join us as we illuminate The Woman clothed with the sun and the moon under her feat!

We will focus on the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe that appeared on the tilma of Juan Diego. Her image is surrounded by a border of Castilla Roses and silver milagros, coming in a variety of shapes such hearts, moons, angels, etc., brought to the South Americas by the Spanish. These were placed on altars for votive oerings and healing. In this week-long workshop we will hand-grind pigments to make tempera, the paint used by the medieval illuminators to craft the beautiful illuminated pages in the Books of Hours. Techniques such as color mixing, raising and shadowing garments, glazing for painting face and hands, ora & fauna will be taught along with various methods of gilding including, raised and burnished gold, making our own liquid 23kt gold and gilding with palladium and silver alum. We will also discuss gesture as language and the image as codex: how Our Lady of Guadalupe used these powerful tools to set an extraordinary example of enculturation thereby creating a way to communicate to the Indians in the New World as far back as 1553 when she appeared to St. Juan Diego, and, how Our Lady of Guadalupe continues to become an important part of the new evangelization in our day of which John Paul II spoke about.

Workshop will include all art supplies such as brushes, pigments, binders, parchment, etc.

Traditional Miniature Materials & Techniques Covered in the Class:
• Making a binder
• Grinding pigments to make tempera
• Raised, burnished and tooled gold
• Making liquid gold from 23k powder gold

• Raised and burnished palladium
• The Golden Grisaille technique
• Color mixing techniques
• Transferring intricate designs for painting in gold

• Raising the garments: painting and floating the garment base colors, building up the shadows through
glazes and highlighting the folds.
• Inverse embroidery technique.
• Rendering the face through techniques of delicate stipple washes interlaced with “white glazes” create a
sfumato effect
• Outlining techniques

Enrollment is open to members and nonmembers. No experience necessary.

If you are an artist and are accustomed to using a lamp, such as an OTT light or similar task lamp, please fell free to bring one. Also since we are doing miniature painting with tiny details you may wish you can bring a magnifier such as the gooseneck style that sits on the desk or a the head-visor type...whatever you are comfortable with. While its not necessary it can be a great help. All other materials will be provided by the instructor.

Only 12 Spaces Available

*This workshop includes the use real gold and palladium, the cost of which is variable and has risen in the past 12 months.

Parking: Ample parking for the workshop is available on the church property, both behind the church are the spaces in front of the rectory, on the church property. Street parking is also available but check and obey the signs or you will be ticketed. Parking tickets are not the responsiblity of the Catholic Art Guild or St. John Cantius parish.

Refunds are available until July 8, 2018.

Mark Nowakowski: “Quality and the Discernment of an authentic Catholic aesthetic”

Details:
Jul. 14, 11:00 am
More information: https://www.catholicartguild.org/speaker-series-mark-nowakowski

11:00 am, St. John Cantius Parish Hall

Synopsis: This talk will explore the "Quality and the Discernment of an authentic Catholic aesthetic" as a key component professional and spiritual pursuit. Topics covered will include:

*Is there an authentic Catholic aesthetic? (Short answer: Yes, though it is a range of aesthetics, both conservative in scope from the outside yet incredibly wide and potent from the inside).

*Is quality a matter of opinion, or can it be known? (Both: we can square the idea of "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" equally with "Beauty is Truth.")

*How to speak to non-artists or artists overly influenced by modernism or populism? (How to maintain and insist on a higher standard in keeping with our calling as Catholic artists).

*How does one discern quality in their own work? (The ongoing process of a Catholic-centered development of taste, and how this can be balanced with our artistic nature and our desire to truly "push forward" in certain kinds of work).

*How does one discern quality in the life of the Church? (Liturgical vs. non-liturgical sacred works).

*How does an artist, patron, or fan of the arts undertake the process of discernment?

*The soul-deadening morass of modernism and populism, and how to use aesthetic fasting to 'reset' the spiritual-aesthetic filter God gave us.

​Bio: Mark Nowakowski is a composer whose works represent a modern merger of bold expressionism and mystical contemplation, Slavic pathos and American individualism. His work has been commissioned and performed globally by such notables as the Kronos Quartet, the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, The Monteverdi Cello Octet, The Voxare Quartet, the FiveOne Experimental Orchestra, Three Notch’d Road, Stowarzyszenia Mozart, Vox Musica of Sacramento, the Choir of the Shrine of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, and the Cracow Brass Quintet. His debut album on Naxos, “Blood, Forgotten” was praised by Gramophone Magazine for its “intense emotional worlds” with “writing that is at once fierce, haunting, and mystical“, while evoking “dramatic and pscyhological atmospheres as if Bartok and Shostakovich were looking over shoulder, but with his own sense of urgency, rhythm, and color.” Reviewer David Denton writes that “Mark Nowakowski has positioned himself among the cutting-edge composers” with this album release.

The son of Polish immigrants, Mark’s music derives a great deal of its experiential and aesthetic influence from his bicultural experience. Philosophically and spiritually, he is deeply influenced by the long history of Catholic mysticism, and is always seeking the transcendent element in all of his work.

In 2011, the Kronos Quartet premiered his “String Quartet #2: Grandfather Songs” at the International Festival of Polish Music in Krakow. In 2012, he was the composer in residence for Projekt Mozart, seeing his “O Pieknosci Niestworzona” premiered in a concert tour of seven Polish cities culminating in Czestochowa and Warsaw. In 2008, he served as the Composer in Residence for the Canton Symphony Orchestra. He is a member of “Multimode Filter,” an electronic music composer collaboration. Mark is also the music curator for the Foundation for Sacred Arts. His writings have been published in Sacred Music Journal and at newmusicbox.org, while his columns on new music and music technology regularly appear in the Communities Digital News.

Mark received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Maryland, where he also won the biennial Walsum Award for Excellence in Music Composition. He holds a Professional Studies degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music, where he was Assistant Director of the CIM New Music Festival and was awarded the Donald Erb Prize in Composition. He holds his Masters from the University of Colorado, and two undergraduate degrees from Illinois State University where he graduated with honors in both Music Theory and Arts Technology. His main composition teachers include Paul Schoenfield, Daniel Kellogg, Mark Wilson, Margaret Brouwer, Larry Moss, Steven Taylor, John Drumheller, and Michael Theodore. He has taught at the University of Maryland, Christendom College, Benedictine University, and DuPage College of Illinois, and currently serves on the faculty of music at Kent State Stark. http://www.marknowakowski.com/

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Jul. 11, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

France and America: “The Old World Meets the New” (Organ Recital of Zaccheus Lock)

Details:
Jul. 1, 3:00 pm
ABOUT THIS CONCERT

In this program, organist Zacchaeus Lock will explore some of the great works in the French and American traditions. While the music of France might at times be characterized by its tradition and restraint, some French composers have certainly eschewed such processes, opting instead for a courageous musical individualism similar to that found in the music of many American composers. Gospel tunes and Gregorian Chant will collide in an entertaining program of 19th and 20h century music, including works of Langlais, Bolcom, and Lefebure-Wely.

BIOGRAPHY

Zacchaeus Lock, winner of the 2017 AGO Pittsburgh Chapter Quimby Regional Competition for Young Organists, is music director and organist at St. Anthony's Church in Follansbee, West Virginia. Having completed his undergraduate study at Franciscan University of Steubenville with Nicholas Will and Dr. Jessica Ewell, studying both philosophy and sacred music, he has in past years played for numerous churches of all sorts and sizes in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, and Connecticut, along with a memorable stint as organ scholar at Calvary Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, working with Dr. Alan Lewis. As an alumnus of the St. Mary's Student Schola (directed by David Hughes and Charles Weaver) Zacchaeus sang for thousands at World Youth Day 2011 in Madrid as well as at events in New York City, Boston, and elsewhere; his experience working with professional ensembles under such diverse directorship as Scott Turkington, Chris Mueller, and Wilko Brouwers influences the hands-on choral work he does today.

TICKETS

$15 - adult
$10 - senior over 65
$10 - student
$5 - youth 6-18 years

Tickets are available at the door.

Second Annual Saint John’s Ball

Details:
Jun. 29, 8:00 pm
Where will you be on Friday, June 29th? Once again, young men and women from the Chicago area will meet and mingle during a night of music, dancing, wine and laughter.

St. John's Ball

As Chicagoans celebrate the weekend at bars and street festivals, hundreds of young adults will gather for 'St. John's Eve' at Chicago's lakeshore with a traditional Ball, the second annual Saint John's Ball, experiencing the grandeur of a bygone era.

Building on the success of last year's inaugural Ball (see article in Regina Magazine), we are excited to showcase a 30-piece orchestra and a larger venue which features an even more spacious dance floor. This year's venue is the historic South Shore Cultural Center, a Chicago landmark built in 1916 on the lakefront.


The first ever St. John's Ball was a grand success.



The Ball, held near the midsummer solstice, in honor of the feast of St. John the Baptist, joins in the long tradition of lively evening celebrations where historically Catholic cultures would commemorate "St. John's Eve". They would have bonfires or other festivities to mark the day with the longest available daylight. The coming shortening of days mirrored St. John the Baptist's own words, "He must increase, but I must decrease." The Ball will be a celebration filled with elegance, grandeur, and chivalry.

St. Johns Ball Chicago


The ticket price includes not only admission to the ball, but complimentary dance lessons, wine, and hors d'oeuvres. Dance lessons begin at 8pm, and the Ball kicks off at 9pm on Friday, June 29th. In addition, there will be free dance lessons in waltz and polka leading up to the Ball. These will be held at St. John Cantius' Church on select Sundays.

These events are hosted by Quo Vadis Young Adults from St. John Cantius Church, a parish community that is well known for its story of renaissance. WFMT, Chicago’s premiere classical radio station, says, "St John Cantius Church has established itself as a cultural hub in the Chicago area."

Please join us as we revive the elegance of a bygone era! Floor length gowns, satin gloves, and black ties will abound as St. John's Ball promises to be the event of the summer.

Click here to purchase tickets today as space is limited!

This program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency.

“French Reverence” - Gargoyle Brass & Organ Concert

Details:
Jun. 24, 3:00 pm


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Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble: "French Reverence"


The Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble celebrates French music of the late-19th and early 20th centuries at St. John Cantius Church, featuring the church's highly regarded resident organists on an historic instrument ideally suited to the repertoire.

The Gargoyles' "French Reverence" concert program includes two of its own commissioned arrangements, Alexandre Guilmant's Symphony No. 1, Op. 42; and Maurce Ravel's "Pavane for a Dead Princess," both arranged for brass and organ by Craig Garner. Also on offer are Marcel Dupré's "Poème héroïque" for brass, organ, and field drum; and Dupré's "Symphony-Passion" for solo organ.

Organists Corrado Cavalli and Jonathan Rudy will perform on the church's Casavant Frères Organ Opus 1130, nicknamed "Tina Mae." The Romantic-style four-manual organ comprises 3,800 wood and metal pipes, the largest 16-feet tall, the smallest a few inches high. The unaltered 85-year-old instrument, relocated from an abandoned Chicago church where it had fallen into disuse, was restored and installed at St. John Cantius in 2013.

Cavalli, a native of Turin, Italy, joined St. John Cantius as organist in 2015. He received master's degrees in organ, choral conducting and choral composition from National Conservatory "Giuseppe Verdi" in Turin. Prior to taking the post at the Chicago church, he served as a church organist, music theory professor, and member of the Commission for Sacred Music for the Archdiocese in Turin. His awards include the 12th National Organ Competition's Pinchi Prize and the Brownson Fellowship for his doctoral studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has recorded for Sony Classical, among other labels.

Rudy, Director of Musical Arts and Administration at St. John Cantius, has performed across the U.S., including an appearance at the 2016 American Guild of Organists National Convention in Houston, Tex. He has recorded for the Pro Organo and Sony Classical labels. Among his other credits, Rudy won First Prize and Audience Prize at the National Young Artists Competition in Organ Performance. He holds degrees from Indiana and Valparaiso Universities and is currently pursuing a doctorate in organ and sacred music at Indiana.

St. Cecilia Choir & Orchestra at 12:30 pm Mass

St. Cecilia Choir and Orchestra

Details:
Jun. 24, 12:30 pm  -  Feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist
Missa Brevis in F, K. 192, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Scande coeli limina, KV 34, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Alma Dei Creatoris, KV 277, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Inter natos mulierum, K 72, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)


Anthony Visco Workshop: The Four Canons of Composition

Details:
Jun. 18, 8:00 am
Dates: Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 9:00 AM –Fri, Jun 22, 2018, 4:00 PM CDT

The Four Canons of Composition

Instructor: Anthony Visco

Course Description: Sacred art and composition of our images become the matrix for content. This one week workshop will demonstrate how and why certain compositions are used in liturgical, devotional and religious art and architecture. Demonstrations and discussions will cover the contemporary use of the traditional language. The inherent qualities of these Four Canons become obvious as they unite both sign and symbol throughout Western and Eastern iconography and thus become the roots of representational composition especially in sacred art. In essence, this course is designed to assist the artist in finding greater syntheses between the canons of composition and content.

Day 1: The Monolithic and Bilateral Canon: Heaven to Earth The Synchronicity of Time and Eternity The Use of Center and the Central

Day 2 The Rotational Canon: Heaven on Earth: The Sacred in the Temporal /Eternity in Time Making the Worldly Space Sacred

Day 3: The Helical Canon: Heaven, Earth, and the Underworld Conflict of Light and Dark and between Time and Eternity The Conscious and The Unconscious

Day 4: The Spiral Canon: Heaven and Earth Order and Chaos /Causality and Uncertainty Meet Integration and Disintegration of Separations

Day 5: The Composite Canon: Composing with more than one of the Four Canons

Our Schedule:

8:00 am Low Mass (for those that wish to attend)

9:00 AM: Lecture session begin with a power point lecture on each of the Four
Canons with discussion a drawn demonstration along with drawing exercises.

11:45: Midday prayer with the Canons

12:00-1:00 Lunch

1:00-4:30 Sketching on location (Inside St. John Cantius & The Art Institute of Chicago)

4:45 Vespers with the Canons

Materials List:

Drawing Pad/ at least18’ by 24’
Tracing paper (small pad)
Graph paper ¼ inch
Erasers, hard and kneaded
Straight edge
HB and 2B pencils, sharpening tools, sanding block
Sketchbook for taking notes

Students must bring their own materials.

Workshop includes entrance into the Art Institute of Chicago with Anthony Visco

Parking:

Ample parking for the workshop is available on the church property, both behind the church are the spaces in front of the rectory, on the church property. Street parking is also available but check and obey the signs or you will be ticketed. Parking tickets are not the responsiblity of the Catholic Art Guild or St. John Cantius parish.

Refunds:

Full refunds are available until July 8, 2018.

More information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/anthony-visco-workshop-the-four-canons-of-composition-tickets-44393320617

“Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” (1920)

Accompanied on our Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ by Jay Warren

Details:
Jun. 17, 3:00 pm  -  John Barrymore stars in the renowned silent adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic.


John Barrymore stars in the renowned silent adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic about a Victorian scientist who turns himself into a murderous abomination.

Tickets

$10 - General Admission
$5 - Kids 12 and under
$30 - Family Price (Mom, Dad and Kids)



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Tickets are also available at the door.



Overview

Color black and white
Director John S.Robertson
Identifier DrJekyllandMrHyde
Run time 82 minutes
Sound silent with music score
Year 1920



Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a 1920 horror silent film, produced by Famous Players-Lasky and released through Paramount/Artcraft. The film is based upon Robert Louis Stevenson's novella The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and starring actor John Barrymore.

The film was directed by John S. Robertson and co-starred Nita Naldi. The scenario was by Clara Beranger. This story of split personality has Dr. Jekyll a kind and charitable man who believes that everyone has two sides, one good and one evil. Using a potion, his personalities are split, creating havoc.

Plot

Henry Jekyll (John Barrymore) is a doctor of medicine, an idealist, and philanthropist. When he is not treating the poor in his free clinic, he is in his laboratory experimenting. Sir George Carew (Brandon Hurst), the father of his fiancée, Millicent (Martha Mansfield), is "piqued" by Dr. Jekyll. "No man could be as good as he looks," Carew says. Following dinner one night, Carew taunts Dr. Jekyll in front of their friends, Edward Enfield (Cecil Clovelly), Dr. Lanyon (Charles Lane) and Utterson (J. Malcolm Dunn) proclaiming "In devoting yourself to others, Jekyll, aren't you neglecting the development of your own life?" "Isn't it by serving others that one develops oneself?" Jekyll replies. "Which self?" Carew retorts. "Man has two - as he has two hands. Because I use my right hand, should I never use my left? Your really strong man fears nothing. It is the weak one who is afraid of experience. A man cannot destroy the savage in him by denying its impulses. The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it. With your youth, you should live - as I have lived. I have memories. What will you have at my age?"

And thus the seed is sown, and Jekyll begins his experiments. As he observes, "Wouldn't it be marvellous if the two natures in man could be separated - housed in different bodies? Think what it would mean to yield to every evil impulse, yet leave the soul untouched!" Finally, Jekyll develops a potion that turns him into a hideously evil creature that he calls Edward Hyde. As this creature, he is not recognizable as Dr. Jekyll, and, so, to facilitate the comings and goings of Hyde, he tells his servant, Poole (George Stevens), that Hyde is to have "full authority and liberty about the house."

Jekyll thus begins to live his double life. Hyde sets up a room in one of the seediest parts of London. He brings in a girl from the dance hall, Gina (Nita Naldi), to live with him there and frequents opium dens, dance halls, and bars - any place that satisfies his evil desires. Although Jekyll has developed a potion that will also return him to his original appearance and character as Dr. Jekyll, each time he takes the potion to become Edward Hyde, he worsens. He not only looks more evil, he becomes more evil, as well.

Millicent Carew is worried about the absence of her fiancé, so Sir George goes to call on Jekyll to see what is the matter. Although Jekyll is not home when he calls, Sir George encounters Hyde in the street just as he knocks a small boy to the ground injuring him. To make recompense for his actions, he goes and gets a check which he returns to the boy's father. Carew notices that the check has been signed by Dr. Jekyll. He confronts Poole who tells him the story of Edward Hyde.

In the meantime, Hyde/Jekyll has returned to the lab and, after drinking the potion, returns to his original self. Sir George finds him in the lab and demands to know his relationship with "a vile thing like Hyde?"
"What right have you to question me - you who first tempted me?" says Jekyll. Sir George angrily retorts that unless Jekyll is forthcoming with an explanation, he must object to his marriage to Millicent. This angers Jekyll to the point that he suddenly becomes Hyde, right in front of Sir George's eyes, without benefit of the potion. Sir George runs into the courtyard where Hyde catches him and clubs him to death with his walking stick. Hyde runs to his apartment and destroys any evidence that may link him to Jekyll. He eludes the police by only minutes and returns to his lab where he is able to drink the potion that restores him as Jekyll.

In the ensuing days, as Millicent grieves, Jekyll is tortured by his misdeeds. Soon, the drug needed to make the potion that will return him as Dr. Jekyll is depleted and cannot be found in all of London. Jekyll stays locked up in his lab fearing he may become Hyde at any moment. Millicent finally goes to see him, but just as she is about to enter the lab, he begins to transform into Hyde. Jekyll consumes the poison in the ring he took from the Italian dancer before he opens the door, fully transformed into Hyde. He lets her in, locks the door and grabs her in his arms. Suddenly, he starts convulsing. Millicent runs from the lab and when Lanyon comes in, he finds Hyde sitting in a chair, having just died, and his appearance returned to that of Dr. Jekyll. He discerns that Jekyll committed suicide, and calls the others (Poole, Utterson and Millicent) in, but declares to them that Hyde has killed Dr. Jekyll. In the final shot, Millicent is grieving next to the body of Dr. Jekyll.

Production

The early part of Jekyll's initial transformation into Hyde was achieved with no makeup, instead relying solely on Barrymore's ability to contort his face. In one scene, as Hyde reverts to Jekyll, one of Hyde's prosthetic fingers can be seen to fly across the screen, having been shaken loose by Barrymore's convulsions. The character of Millicent Carew does not appear in Stevenson's original story, but in the 1887 stage version by Thomas Russell Sullivan starring Richard Mansfield. This 1920 film version used the play's concept of Jekyll being engaged to Carew's daughter, and Hyde beginning a dalliance with a dance-hall girl.

Jay Warren - Photoplay Organist

Jay Warren - Chicago's foremost photoplay organist - brings all the color, excitement, and glamour of the silent film era back to life with his original scores for the silver screen. As a regularly featured photoplay organist for the Silent Film Society of Chicago, he has accompanied most of the great silent films throughout his forty year career in his famous rousing style. He has been featured annually for the society's highly regarded Silent Summer Film Festival since its inception in 2000. For twelve consecutive years he held forth playing the huge E.M. Skinner pipe organ for silent films at the University of Chicago's famed Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. He also performs film accompaniment on the beautiful Letourneau pipe organ in the Crimi Auditorium of Aurora University. Jay has also made several silent film photoplay appearances on the incredible 5 manual Wurlitzer located at the Sanfilippo Foundation's Place de la Musique in Barrington, Illinois.

Learn more at: http://silentfilmsjaywarren.com/index.html

Wurlitzer Organ at St. John Cantius

In the Church Hall of St. John Cantius is found a Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ. It was built in 1927 and is listed as Opus 1818. This organ was originally installed in the Terrace Theatre at 361 West 23rd Street in 1927, and, in 1935, it was moved to the WOR Radio Studio, 1440 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10018. After restoration, this instrument was installed on the stage of the Church Hall at St. John Cantius in 2012.

WOR began broadcasting from the 6th floor of Bamberger’s Department Store at 131 Market Street in Newark, N.J. WOR was the only station to broadcast on Christmas Day 1922, and thus was the first sound heard by those who found a crystal set under the tree that year. In December 1924, WOR added a studio in Manhattan, on the 9th floor of Chickering Hall at 27 West 57th Street. Later that year, the station moved its New York studio to 1440 Broadway, two blocks from Times Square. In the autumn of 1934, WOR formed the Mutual Broadcasting System. Additional studios were built at the New Amsterdam Theatre and the converted Guild and Longacre Theatres in the Times Square district. Alot of best-known dramatic programs originated from WOR’s studios, including “The Shadow”, “Nick Carter, Private Detective” and “True Detective Mysteries.”

Today, this organ is used to accompany silent films in the Church Hall of St. John Cantius. We are grateful to Jay Warren of the Silent Film Society of Chicago for his collaboration in assisting us with our ongoing silent film series. The organ is also used for the annual St. Nick Sing-a-long to accompany the singing of popular Christmas carols, and for other parish social events throughout the year.

Specifications

Wurlitzer Organ Company
North Tonawanda, N.Y. – Opus 1818 (1927)
Electro-pneumatic action
Style E
2 manuals, 7 ranks

Pedals —32 notes

16 Diaphone
16 Bourdon
8 Trumpet
8 Diaphonic Diapason
8 Tibia Clausa
8 Flute
8 Cello
Pedal 2nd Touch
Bass Drum
Kettle Drum
Crash Cymbal
Cymbal

Accompaniment (Manual I) –- 61 notes

16 Contra Viole [TC]
16 Vox Humana [TC]
8 Trumpet
8 Diaphonic Diapason
8 Tibia Clausa
8 Violin
8 Violin Celeste [TC]
8 Concert Flute
8 Vox Humana
4 Octave
4 Piccolo
4 Viole
4 Octave Celeste
4 Flute
4 Vox Humana
2 Piccolo
Harp Chrysoglott
Snare Drum
Tambourine
Castanets
Chinese Block
Tom-Tom
Sleigh Bells

Accompaniment 2nd Touch

Trumpet
Tibia Clausa
Cathedral Chimes
Triangle

Five Adjustable Combination Pistons

Solo (Manual II) – 61 notes

16 Diaphone
16 Tibia Clausa [TC]
16 Bourdon
16 Vox Humana [TC]
8 Trumpet
8 Diaphonic Diapason
8 Tibia Clausa
8 Violin
8 Violin Celeste [TC]
8 Concert Flute
8 Vox Humana
4 Octave
4 Piccolo
4 Viole
4 Viole Celeste
4 Flute
2 2/3 Twelfth
2 Piccolo
1 3/5 Tierce
Cathedral Chimes
Xylophone
Glockenspiel
Harp Chrysoglott

Solo 2nd Touch

16 Trumpet [TC]
8 Tibia Clausa

Five Adjustable Combination Pistons
General
One Balanced Expression Pedal
One General Tremulant
One Vox Humana Tremulant
Effects (operated by pistons)
Horse Hoofs
Surf Effect
Bird
Train
Auto Horn
Fire Gong
Fire Gong (reiterating)
Steamboat Whistle
Siren
Door Bell (push button)

Sources:

Cinema Treasures website: http://www.cinematreasures.org Junchen, David L., comp. and ed. by
Jeff Weiler. The WurliTzer Pipe Organ – An Illustrated History. Chicago: The American Theatre
Organ Society, 2005.

Kaufmann, Preston J. Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ, Vol. 3. Pasadena: Showcase
Publications, 1995. New Jersey Radio Museum website:
http://www.angelfire.com/nj2/piratejim/nycamhistory.html

Magnificat Choir, 11 am Mass

Magnificat Choir

Details:
Jun. 17, 11:00 am  -  11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Missa Quinti Toni, Orlando di Lasso (1532-1594)



If Ye Love Me, Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)



Gloria tibi Trinitatis, Mamerts Celminskis (1912-1993)

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Jun. 13, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Details:
Jun. 10, 12:30 pm
New musical works of Nicholas White, composed for this occasion, are premiered today:

Missa “Jesu Dulcis Memoria”
Jubilate Deo
Jesu Dulcis Memoria
O Salutaris Hostia


The St. Cecilia Choir and the Magnificat Choir will be conducted by Nicholas White.

Review

“Unashamedly beautiful, Nicholas White’s choral music makes you think about the function of music and how a composer decides on the rightness of its design. White’s music never cloys. It is beautifully crafted, the manner of word-setting stemming very much from the English choral tradition… music that soothes more often than it challenges, while still stimulating the imagination as it nourishes the spirit.”

International Record Review ~ June 2007

About Nicholas White

Nicholas White is a Grammy nominated composer and conductor, as well as a versatile organist, pianist and singer with experience in many different styles of music. In 2011, Nicholas was appointed to the post of Director of Chapel Music & Organist at St. Paul’s School, Concord, New Hampshire. In 2012 he became Chair of the Arts at the school. In 2013 he was appointed Music Director of The Boston Cecilia, one of America’s oldest and finest performing arts organizations. Learn more at: https://www.birettabooks.com/nicholas-white

Twenty Finger Fete

Saori Chiba & Michael McElvain

Details:
Jun. 9, 6:00 pm  -  1907 Mason and Hamlin Concert Grand Piano


Tickets

$15 - adults
$10 - seniors over 65 and students
$5 - youth 6-18 years



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St. Cecilia Choir, 11 am Mass

Feast of Corpus Christi (External Solemnity) - St. Cecilia Choir and Orchestra

Details:
Jun. 3, 11:00 am  -  Latin High Mass, Extraordinary and Corpus Christi Procession
Missa Gratias agimus tibi ZWV 13, Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745)











Magnificat, ZWV 108, Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745)


Organ Music for Sunday

Details:
Jun. 3, 9:00 am
9 am English Mass - Ordinary Form

Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552, J. S. Bach
Ave Maris Stella, Liszt
Allegro from Sonata 11 in D minor, Josef Rheinberger

11 am Latin Solemn High Mass and Eucharistic Procession - Extraordinary Form

Organ Music of Corpus Christi, 7:30 pm Mass

Details:
May. 31, 7:30 pm
Fugue on Lauda Sion, Jaques-Nicolas Lemmens (1823 – 1881)

Lauda Sion, Denis Bedard (b. 1950)

Finale from Sonata 1, Felix Alexandre Guilmant (1837 – 1911)

“A Sailor Made Man” (1921)

Featuring Harold Lloyd and Mildred Davis

Details:
May. 27, 3:00 pm  -  Silent Film (1921) accompanied by Jay Waren on our 1925 Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ
Tickets

$10 - General Admission
$5 - Kids 12 and under
$30 - Family Price (Mom, Dad and Kids)




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Movie Plot

"The Boy" (Lloyd) is an idle playboy and heir to $20,000,000, relaxing at an exclusive resort. When he sees "The Girl" (Mildred Davis), surrounded by a flock of admirers, he suddenly asks her to marry him. Taken aback, she sends him to get the approval of her father, a tough, hardworking steel magnate.

The girl's father knows and disapproves of the Boy's indolence, and demands that he first get a job to prove that he can do something. The Boy sees a recruiting poster and applies to join the United States Navy. When the magnate decides to take a long cruise on his yacht, he tells his daughter to bring along her friends. She invites the Boy, but he finds he cannot get out of his three-year enlistment.



Aboard ship, he makes an enemy of intimidating sailor "Rough-House" O'Rafferty (Noah Young), but when O'Rafferty throws a box at the Boy and strikes a passing officer, the Boy steps up and accepts the blame. He and O'Rafferty then become good friends.



The Girl and her friends stop off at the port of Agar Shahar Khairpura, the "City of a Thousand Rascals", in the country of Khairpura-Bhandanna, to sightsee, just as the Boy and O'Rafferty get shore leave there. The Girl is delighted to see the Boy and rushes into his arms. However, she has also attracted the attention of the Maharajah of Khairpura-Bhandanna (Dick Sutherland).



The potentate has her kidnapped and taken to his palace. The Boy rushes to her rescue and single-handedly manages to outwit the Maharajah and his guards and escape with the Girl.



Later, the Boy uses signal flags from his ship to ask with the Girl on her father's yacht, "Will you?" With her father's approval, she sends a signal back, "I will".

Movie Cast

Harold Lloyd - The Boy
Mildred Davis - The Girl
Noah Young - The Rowdy Element
Dick Sutherland - Maharajah of Khairpura-Bhandanna

Movie Production

Considered to be Lloyd's first feature-length film, the extended running time of A Sailor-Made Man came about purely by accident. During production, with an excessive number of gags written into the story, it became apparent that the film would be longer than the traditional 2-reel short.

Producer Hal Roach decided they should just go ahead and shoot everything they had come up with, and worry about cutting down the length later. Often dependent on the preview process, Lloyd decided to preview the film at its 40-plus minute length to see which parts didn't work.



However, the audiences enjoyed the extended cut so much, Lloyd decided not to change a thing and kept it as a 4-reel comedy.

Recpetion

Considered to be Lloyd's first feature-length film, the extended running time of A Sailor-Made Man came about purely by accident. During production, with an excessive number of gags written into the story, it became apparent that the film would be longer than the traditional 2-reel short. Producer Hal Roach decided they should just go ahead and shoot everything they had come up with, and worry about cutting down the length later. Often dependent on the preview process, Lloyd decided to preview the film at its 40-plus minute length to see which parts didn't work. However, the audiences enjoyed the extended cut so much, Lloyd decided not to change a thing and kept it as a 4-reel comedy.

Jay Warren - Photoplay Organist

Jay Warren - Chicago's foremost photoplay organist - brings all the color, excitement, and glamour of the silent film era back to life with his original scores for the silver screen. As a regularly featured photoplay organist for the Silent Film Society of Chicago, he has accompanied most of the great silent films throughout his forty year career in his famous rousing style. He has been featured annually for the society's highly regarded Silent Summer Film Festival since its inception in 2000. For twelve consecutive years he held forth playing the huge E.M. Skinner pipe organ for silent films at the University of Chicago's famed Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. He also performs film accompaniment on the beautiful Letourneau pipe organ in the Crimi Auditorium of Aurora University. Jay has also made several silent film photoplay appearances on the incredible 5 manual Wurlitzer located at the Sanfilippo Foundation's Place de la Musique in Barrington, Illinois.

Learn more at: http://silentfilmsjaywarren.com/index.html

Contact Jay: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 773-205-7372




St. Cecilia Choir, 12:30 pm Mass

St. Cecilia Choir and Orchestra

Details:
May. 27, 12:30 pm  -  Feast of the Most Holy Trinity
Mass No. 2 in E Minor, WAB 27, Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)



Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals, Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933)



Grand Choeur Dialogue, Eugène Gigout (1844-1925)