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“Iron Mask”

Bring friends & family to the church hall for this fun show!

Details:
Jan. 28, 3:00 pm  -  Pizza, popcorn, candy, and soda will be served.


The whole family will enjoy this movie about "The Three Musketeers"

TICKETS

$10 (General Admission)
$5 (Kids 12 and under)
$30 (Mom, Dad and all the kids)



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Order tickets online (see below) or call 1-800-838-3006. Tickets are also available at the door.

JAY WARREN - ORGANIST

Jay Warren - Chicago's foremost photoplay organist - brings all the color, excitement, and glamour of the silent film era back to life with his original scores for the silver screen. As a regularly featured photoplay organist for the Silent Film Society of Chicago, he has accompanied most of the great silent films throughout his forty year career in his famous rousing style. He has been featured annually for the society's highly regarded Silent Summer Film Festival since its inception in 2000. For twelve consecutive years he held forth playing the huge E.M. Skinner pipe organ for silent films at the University of Chicago's famed Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. He also performs film accompaniment on the beautiful Letourneau pipe organ in the Crimi Auditorium of Aurora University. Jay has also made several silent film photoplay appearances on the incredible 5 manual Wurlitzer located at the Sanfilippo Foundation's Place de la Musique in Barrington, Illinois.

SUMMARY

King Louis XIII of France is thrilled to have born to him a son - an heir to the throne. But when the queen delivers a twin, Cardinal Richelieu sees the second son as a potential for revolution, and has him sent off to Spain to be raised in secret to ensure a peaceful future for France. Alas, keeping the secret means sending Constance, lover of D'Artagnan, off to a convent. D'Artagnan hears of this and rallies the Musketeers in a bid to rescue her. Unfortunately, Richelieu out-smarts the Musketeers and banishes them forever. Richelieu enlists D'Artagnan to look after and protect the young prince. Meanwhile, de Rochefort learns of the twins and Richelieu's plans, and kidnaps the twin, raising him in secret. Many years later, with Richelieu dead and the young prince crowned King Louis XIV, Rochefort launches his plan. The king is kidnapped, replaced with his twin, put in an iron mask so as not to be recognized, and led off to a remote castle to be held prisoner. Louis XIV is able to alert D'Artagnan, who realizes that only his friends Athos, Porthos, and Aramis can help him, so he reunites the Musketeers to derail Rochefort's nefarious plot but at a heavy toll.

—Theron Trowbridge

OVERVIEW

The Iron Mask is a 1929 American part-talkie adventure film directed by Allan Dwan. It is an adaptation of the last section of the novel The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, père, which is itself based on the French legend of the Man in the Iron Mask.

CAST

Douglas Fairbanks - D'Artagnan
Belle Bennett - The Queen Mother
Marguerite De La Motte - Constance Bonacieux
Dorothy Revier - Milady de Winter
Vera Lewis - Madame Peronne
Rolfe Sedan - Louis XIII
William Bakewell - Louis XIV/Twin Brother
Gordon Thorpe - Young Prince/Twin Brother
Nigel De Brulier - Cardinal Richelieu
Ullrich Haupt - Count De Rochefort
Lon Poff - Father Joseph: the Queen's Confessor
Charles Stevens - Planchet: D'Artagnan's Servant
Henry Otto - the King's Valet
Leon Bary - Athos
Tiny Sandford - Porthos (*Stanley J. Sandford)
Gino Corrado - Aramis

PRODUCTION BACKGROUND

The 1929 part-talkie version, titled The Iron Mask, was the first talking picture starring Douglas Fairbanks, though until recently it was usually shown in a silent version. The film stars Fairbanks as d'Artagnan, Marguerite De La Motte as his beloved Constance (who is killed early in the film to protect the secret that the King has a twin brother), Nigel De Brulier as the scheming Cardinal Richelieu, and Ullrich Haupt as the evil Count De Rochefort. William Bakewell appeared as the royal twins.

Fairbanks lavished resources on his final silent film, with the knowledge he was bidding farewell to his beloved genre. This marks the only time where Fairbanks's character dies at the end of the film, with the closing scene depicting the once-again youthful Musketeers all reunited in death, moving on (as the final title says) to find "greater adventure beyond".

The original 1929 release, though mostly a silent film, actually had a soundtrack: two short speeches delivered by Fairbanks, and a musical score with a few sound effects. In 1952, it was reissued, with the intertitles removed and a narration voiced by Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. added. The original film included a scene in which d'Artagnan tells the young King of an embarrassing adventure involving him and the three musketeers. The story is told in flashback but the 1952 version has it in chronological order with the scene with the King cut out.

In 1999, with the cooperation of the Library of Congress and the Museum of Modern Art, Kino Video released a DVD of the 1929 version. A complete set of Vitaphone disks exists for this picture. However, only a small portion of the original sound from these was synchronized with film footage, namely the two short sequences in which Douglas Fairbanks speaks. The rest of the soundtrack, which contained a Synchronized Score along with sound effects was not used as this would make the DVD public domain. (The copyright has expired on the original 1929 sound version.) For this DVD reissue, therefore, a new score was commissioned from composer Carl Davis. The Kino disc also includes excerpts from the 1952 version, some outtakes from the original filming, and some textual background material from the program for the 1999 premiere showing of the reconstruction. A complete restoration of the original sound version has yet to be released.

LEGACY

Fairbanks Biographer Jeffrey Vance has opined, “As a valedictory to the silent screen. The Iron Mask is unsurpassed. In one of his few departures from playing a young man—and with fewer characteristic stunts—Fairbanks comjures up his most multidimensional and moving screen portrayal in a film that is perhaps the supreme achievement of its genre.”