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St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
Jun. 5, 12:30 pm  -  External Solemnity the Sacred Heart
Missa Susana un jour, Claudio Merulo (1533 – 1604)
Improperium, Robert Kruetz (1922 – 1996)
Tollite jugum meum, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)

Silent Film: “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”

Silent Film of 1916 accompanied by Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ

Details:
Jun. 4, 6:00 pm  -  Featuring Capt Nemo and friends


Schedule




5 pm - Doors Open
6 pm - Show Begins

Tickets




$10 - General Admission
$5 - Kids 12 and under



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Plot



During the year 1866, ships of several nations spot a mysterious sea monster, which some suggest to be a giant narwhal. The United States government assembles an expedition in New York City to find and destroy the monster. Professor Pierre Aronnax, a French marine biologist and narrator of the story, who happens to be in New York at the time, receives a last-minute invitation to join the expedition which he accepts. Canadian whaler and master harpoonist Ned Land and Aronnax's faithful servant Conseil are also brought aboard.

The expedition departs Brooklyn aboard the United States Navy frigate Abraham Lincoln and travels south around Cape Horn into the Pacific Ocean. The ship finds the monster after a long search and then attacks the beast, which damages the ship's rudder. The three protagonists are then hurled into the water and grasp hold of the "hide" of the creature, which they find, to their surprise, to be a submarine very far ahead of its era. They are quickly captured and brought inside the vessel, where they meet its enigmatic creator and commander, Captain Nemo.

The rest of the story follows the adventures of the protagonists aboard the creature—the submarine, the Nautilus—which was built in secrecy and now roams the seas free from any land-based government. Captain Nemo's motivation is implied to be both a scientific thirst for knowledge and a desire for revenge on (and self-imposed exile from) civilization. Nemo explains that his submarine is electrically powered and can perform advanced marine biology research; he also tells his new passengers that although he appreciates conversing with such an expert as Aronnax, maintaining the secrecy of his existence requires never letting them leave. Aronnax and Conseil are enthralled by the undersea adventures, but Ned Land can only think of escape.

They visit many places under the oceans, some real-life places, others completely fictional. Thus, the travelers witness the real corals of the Red Sea, the wrecks of the battle of Vigo Bay, the Antarctic ice shelves, the Transatlantic telegraph cable and the fictional submerged land of Atlantis. The travelers also use diving suits to hunt sharks and other marine life with air-guns and have an underwater funeral for a crew member who died when an accident occurred under mysterious—and unknown to the reader—conditions inside the Nautilus. When the Nautilus returns to the Atlantic Ocean, a pack of "poulpes" (usually translated as a giant squid, although in French "poulpe" means "octopus") attacks the vessel and kills a crew member.

Throughout the story Captain Nemo is suggested to have exiled himself from the world after an encounter with the forces that occupied his country that had devastating effects on his family. Not long after the incident of the poulpes, Nemo suddenly changes his behavior toward Aronnax, avoiding him. Aronnax no longer feels the same and begins to sympathize with Ned Land. Near the end of the book, the Nautilus is attacked by a warship of some nation that made Nemo suffer. Filled with hatred and revenge, Nemo ignores Aronnax's pleas for mercy. Nemo—nicknamed angel of hatred by Aronnax—destroys the ship, ramming it just below the waterline, sinking it into the bottom of the sea, much to Aronnax's horror, as he watches the ship plunge into the abyss. Nemo bows before the pictures of his wife and children and is plunged into deep depression after this encounter. For several days after this, the protagonists' situation changes. No one seems to be on board any longer. And the Nautilus apparently now moves about randomly. Ned Land is even more depressed than ever, Conseil fears for Ned's life, and Aronnax, horrified at what Nemo had done to the ship, can no longer stand the situation either. Then one evening, Ned Land announces an opportunity to escape. Although Aronnax wants to leave Nemo, whom he now holds in horror, he still wishes to see him for the last time. But he knows that Nemo would never let him escape, so he has to avoid meeting him. Before the escape, however, he sees him one last time (although secretly), and hears him say "Almighty God! Enough! Enough!". Aronnax immediately goes to his companions and they are ready to escape. But while they loosen the dinghy, they discover that the Nautilus has wandered into the Moskenstraumen, more commonly known as the "Maelstrom". They manage to escape the danger and find refuge on a nearby island off the coast of Norway, but the fate of Nautilus is unknown.

St. Cecilia Choir sings 11 am Mass (Extraordinary Form)

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form and Eucharistic Procession

Details:
May. 29, 11:00 am  -  Solemnity of Corpus Christi, External Solemnity
MUSICAL REPERTOIRE:

Choral Music

Missa Dixit Joseph, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
Lauda Sion, Chant
Respexit Elias, Roland Lassus (1532 – 1594)
O Sacrum Convivium, Cristóbal de Morales (1500 – 1553)

Organ Music

Carillon sur Lauda Sion, Albert Alain (1880 – 1971)
Joie et Clarté des Corps Glorieux, Olivier Messiaen (1908 – 1992)
Communio sur Lauda Sion, Denis Bedard (b.1950)
Lauda Sion, Marcel Dupre (1886 – 1971)

PLEASE NOTE:

1) The 11:00 am Mass will be offered according to the 1962 Missale Romanum (Extraordinary Form)
2) The 11:00 am Mass (Latin High Mass) will be followed by a Eucharistic Procession. If weather permits, the procession will go outside.
3) There is no 12:30 pm Mass on this date.

Cantate Domino Choir sings for 7:30 pm Mass (Corpus Christi)

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
May. 26, 7:30 pm  -  Solemnity of Corpus Christi
Missa sub titulo sancti Leopoldi, Michael Haydn













Ecce Panis, François-Clément Théodore Dubois

Ave Verum, Malcom Archer

Magnificat Choir sings 11 am Mass

Details:
May. 22, 11:00 am
CHORAL MUSIC

Blasius Amon - Missa Super "Pour Ung Plaisir"
Ramiro Real, "Ave Maria
Randall Thomson - "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need"

ORGAN MUSIC

Prelude and Fugue in E flat BWV 552, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
May. 15, 12:30 pm  -  Solemnity of Pentecost
Pastoralmesse, Karl Kempter (1819-1871)



Veni Sancte Spiritus, Leopold Mozart (1719 – 1787) ed. Martin Banner



Confirma hoc, Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825)



Veni Sancte Spiritus, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1719-1787)



ORGAN MUSIC

Offertorio sul Veni creator Spiritus, Lorenzo Perosi (1872 – 1956)

Choral varié sur le theme du 'Veni Creator' op. 4, Maurice Duruflé (1902 – 1986)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 10:30 am Mass

Solemnity of Pentecost

Details:
May. 15, 10:29 am  -  Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form
Pastoralmesse, Karl Kempter (1819-1871)



Veni Sancte Spiritus, Leopold Mozart (1719 – 1787) ed. Martin Banner



Confirma hoc, Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825)



Veni Sancte Spiritus, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1719-1787)



ORGAN MUSIC

Parafrasi su Veni Sancte Spiritus, Massimo Nosetti (1960 – 2013)

Komm, Gott Schöpfer, heiliger Geist BWV 667, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)

Magnificat Choir sings 9 am Mass

Details:
May. 15, 9:00 am
A. Kirschner "Veni Sancte Spiritus"

Concert: Schola Antiqua

Caged Byrd

Details:
May. 14, 7:30 pm  -  A concert of sacred motets and keyboard music by William Byrd with Jason Moy, harpsichord


Tickets




General: $25
Students: $10

Get tickets online here... or call 1-800-838-3006 and asked for "Caged Byrd."

Repertoire



Schola Antiqua, the Chicago-based medieval and Renaissance choir and winner of the 2012 Noah Greenberg Award for contributions to historical performing practice, sings a program of music by the celebrated English composer of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century, William Byrd. The ensemble performs several of his sprawling motets written for five to eight voices.

These sacred works allegorize the plight of recusant Catholics in late sixteenth-century England. Harpsichordist Jason Moy supplements the program with dances and variations from My Ladye Nevells Booke, Byrd’s most important collection of keyboard works before 1591.
Audio Preview of Schola Antiqua






About Schola Antiqua


Schola Antiqua of Chicago is a professional early music ensemble dedicated to the performance of repertory before the year 1600. An ensemble that executes pre-modern music with “sensitivity and style” (Early Music America), Schola Antiqua takes pride in providing the highest standards of research, performance, and education as it highlights underserved repertories in the Western musical canon. Founded in 2000, the organization has received invitations to perform from festivals, libraries, universities, and other institutions across the Midwest. In 2006-2007, Schola Antiqua was Artist-in-Residence at the University of Chicago. The ensemble is currently Artist-in-Residence at the Lumen Christi Institute.



In 2012, Schola Antiqua received the Noah Greenberg Award from the American Musicological Society for outstanding contributions to historical performing practice. Its connections to the academic community can be seen in collaborations with scholars from around the United States. The ensemble has recorded music accompanying Theodore Karp’s Introduction to the Post-Tridentine Mass Proper, 1590-1890 (American Institute of Musicology, 2005), Margot Fassler's Music in the Medieval West (W.W. Norton, 2013), and the medieval art exhibit at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, New York.

Schola Antiqua has released four commercial CDs on the Naxos of America and Discantus labels, and much of the music has not seen a modern recording. Music from these albums has aired on the national broadcasts of With Heart and Voice, Harmonia, and Millennium of Music and has received reviews in Early Music America, Fanfare, the Journal of Plainsong and Medieval Music, and Notes (Music Library Association). The group’s latest CD, Missa Conceptio tua: Medieval and Renaissance Music for Advent (Naxos of America, 2014) was named one of the best classical albums in 2014 by Culture Catch.
Artistic Director



Michael Alan Anderson was named Artistic Director of Schola Antiqua of Chicago in 2008, following the retirement of its founding Artistic Director, Calvin M. Bower, a medieval musicologist and emeritus faculty member from the University of Notre Dame. Anderson is a founding member of the ensemble and currently serves on the musicology faculty of the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, specializing in music and devotion in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. He is author of the book St. Anne in Renaissance Music: Devotion and Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and received the PhD from the University of Chicago in 2008.



Awards include the Noah Greenberg Award (American Musicological Society), the Deems Taylor Award (American Society for Composers, Authors, and Publishers), the Alvin H. Johnson American Musicological Society 50 Dissertation-Year Fellowship, the Grace Frank Grant (Medieval Academy of America), the Provost's Multidisciplinary Award (University of Rochester), the Whiting Foundation Fellowship (University of Chicago), and several travel and research grants.

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
May. 11, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

St. Cecilia Choir sings 12:30 pm Mass

Latin High Mass, Extraordinary Form

Details:
May. 8, 12:30 pm  -  Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord, External Solemnity
Missa Quando lieta sperei, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)





Ascendo Patrem Meum, Blasius Amon (1558 – 1590)

Ascendit Deus, Peter Philips (1560 – 1628)



ORGAN MUSIC

Praeludium Ascensionis, Guido Donati (b.1949)

Majeste du Christ demandant sa gloire a son Pere (l'Ascension), Olivier Messiaen (1908 – 1992)

St. Cecilia Choir sings 11 am Mass

Latin High Mass, Ordinary Form

Details:
May. 8, 11:00 am  -  Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord, Transferred
Missa Quando lieta sperei, Andrea Gabrieli, (1533 – 1585)





Ascendo Patrem Meum, Blasius Amon (1558 – 1590)

Ascendit Deus, Peter Philips (1560 – 1628)



ORGAN MUSIC

Praeludium Ascensionis, Guido Donati (b.1949)

Majeste du Christ demandant sa gloire a son Pere (l'Ascension), Olivier Messiaen (1908 – 1992)

Cantate Domino Choir sings for 7:30 pm Mass (Ascension Thursday)

Details:
May. 5, 7:30 pm
Messe Modale en Septuor, Jehan Alain (1911-1940)

• Sub Tuum Praesidium, Félix-Alexandre Guilmant (1837-1911)

• Regina Caeli, H. 31, Marc-Antoine Charpentier (c.1645-1704)