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Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Oct. 10, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Sep. 12, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Aug. 15, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

“The Eagle” with Rudolph Valentino

Details:
Jul. 29, 3:00 pm
Film Overview



"The Eagle" is a 1925 American silent film directed by Clarence Brown and starring Vilma Bánky, Louise Dresser, and the famous Rudolph Valentino. Based on the novel Dubrovsky by Alexander Pushkin, the film is about a lieutenant in the Russian army who catches the eye of Czarina Catherine II. After he rejects her advances and flees, she puts out a warrant for his arrest, dead or alive. When he learns that his father has been persecuted and killed, he dons a black mask and becomes an outlaw.

Tickets




You can get get advance tickets by ordering below online, or by calling 1-800-838-3006. Tickets are available at the door.




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Movie Plot



Vladimir Dubrovsky (Valentino), a Cossack serving in the Russian army, comes to the notice of the Czarina (Louise Dresser) when he rescues Mascha (Vilma Bánky), a beautiful young lady, and her aunt trapped in a runaway stagecoach. He is delighted when the Czarina offers to make him a general, but horrified when she tries to seduce him. He flees and the Czarina puts a price on his head.



Soon afterwards, he receives a letter from his father informing him that the evil nobleman Kyrilla Troekouroff (James A. Marcus) has taken over his lands and is terrorizing the countryside. Hurrying home, Vladimir learns that his father has died. Vowing to avenge his father and help the victimized peasantry, he adopts a black mask and becomes the Black Eagle, a Robin Hood figure. Discovering that Kyrilla is Mascha's father, he takes the place of a tutor who has been sent for from France, but not previously seen by anyone in the household. Vladimir is thus able to become part of Kyrilla's household.



As Vladimir's love for Mascha grows, he becomes more and more reluctant to continue seeking revenge against her father, and the two eventually flee the Troekouroff estate. Vladimir is captured by the Czarina's men, but the Czarina, once determined to have him executed, has a last-minute change of heart, and she allows Vladimir, given a new French name, and Mascha to leave Russia for Paris.

Film Review



One of Rudolph Valentino’s many gifts as an actor was his talent for playing light comedy. It is a talent that was not brought out often enough in his career, but that The Eagle, one of his last and also one of his best films, takes full advantage of. The Eagle is a delightful light adventure and a wonderful showcase for its star, showing him equally adept at drama, action, comedy, and romance.



The Eagle is set in the Russia of Hollywood’s exotic foreign imaginings. Valentino plays Vladimir, an officer in the Czarina’s horse guard who returns home to exact revenge after his father is dispossessed by a corrupt, wealthy villain and dies a broken man. In the process, he undertakes a double masquerade as a noble masked bandit known as “The Black Eagle” and a Frenchman hired to tutor the villain’s beautiful daughter Mascha (Vilma Banky) in the language of the Russian court.



The plot is so much like the Zorro story that The Eagle might legitimately be considered a Zorro film. There is an echo of the Robin Hood story as well, as The Black Eagle assembles a (little seen) band around him, but the Zorro connection is the stronger. Although Douglas Fairbanks helmed both a Zorro film and a Robin Hood film in the early ‘twenties, The Eagle does not look back to the Fairbanks’ interpretations so much as it anticipates the great films of the sound era, The Mark of Zorro (1940) and The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). The resemblance to the later films is far greater than to the earlier in story, tone, and performance. Tyrone Power’s Zorro and Errol Flynn’s Robin Hood are descendants of Valentino’s Black Eagle, and Flynn’s rapport with Olivia de Havilland in Robin Hood is the closest screen pairing to Valentino and Banky in The Eagle.



Valentino and Banky are perfectly matched in looks and generate undeniable screen chemistry. She also stands up to him as an actress, giving an expressive and subtle performance with range and depth. The most notable supporting performances are by Louise Dresser as the Czarina and Albert Conti as Vladimir’s military superior who becomes her lover (or in the film’s witty euphemism: his ambition to become a general is gratified). The older couple is a humorous counterpoint to the young lovers and while their screen time is small, it is memorable.

The scenarist wrote the film into a corner as the revenge plot collided with the courtship plot, and extricated it by sidestepping the issue. The courtship takes center stage for the finale and the revenge plot is left unresolved. It is a weakness that is easy to overlook in a film that is wonderfully entertaining for reasons having little to do with the story. I know I have always overlooked it because when I recently saw the film for the third time, I realized that while I remembered the story and its conclusion quite clearly, I had completely forgotten that it was problematic.

The Eagle was directed by Clarence Brown, a top Hollywood director of the period, and it has the strengths of a top-quality studio film. The pacing is fluid, the performances are consistently good, and the film moves seamlessly among its various moods. Scenes are well-staged and the camera is mobile, including several extended tracking shots, when it serves the narrative purpose at hand. The film always looks great. The sets by William Cameron Menzies and costumes by Adrian are a visual treat, art deco furnishings and 1920s fashions through the prism of Catherine the Great’s Russia.

-Helen Geib

Organist - Jay Warren



Jay Warren - Chicago's foremost photoplay organist - brings all the color, excitement, and glamour of the silent film era back to life with his original scores for the silver screen. As a regularly featured photoplay organist for the Silent Film Society of Chicago, he has accompanied most of the great silent films throughout his forty year career in his famous rousing style. He has been featured annually for the society's highly regarded Silent Summer Film Festival since its inception in 2000. For twelve consecutive years he held forth playing the huge E.M. Skinner pipe organ for silent films at the University of Chicago's famed Rockefeller Memorial Chapel.



He also performs film accompaniment on the beautiful Letourneau pipe organ in the Crimi Auditorium of Aurora University. Jay has also made several silent film photoplay appearances on the incredible 5 manual Wurlitzer located at the Sanfilippo Foundation's Place de la Musique in Barrington, Illinois. Contact Jay: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) & 773-205-7372

Cast



Rudolph Valentino as Lt. Vladimir Dubrovsky
Vilma Bánky as Miss Mascha Troekouroff
Louise Dresser as The Czarina, Catherine II
Albert Conti as Captain Kuschka
James A. Marcus as Kyrilla Troekouroff
George Nichols as Judge
Carrie Clark Ward as Aunt Aurelia
Michael Pleschkoff as Capt. Kuschka of the Cossack Guard
Spottiswoode Aitken as Dubrovsky's Father
Agostino Borgato as Priest
Mario Carillo as Marcel Le Blanc, French Tutor
Gary Cooper as Masked Cossack
Jean De Briac as Small Role
Otto Hoffman as Man Who Gets Purse Stolen
Eric Mayne as Official Asking for Signature
Russell Simpson as The Eagle's Lieutenant
Mack Swain as Innkeeper
Gustav von Seyffertitz as Court Servant at Dinner

Workshop in Illumination: Our Lady of Guadalupe

Catholic Art Guild

Details:
Jul. 24, 9:00 am
Medieval Illumination of Our Lady of Guadalupe
One Week Intensive Workshop
July 24-July 29, 2017
9:00 am -5:00 pm Monday-Saturday

Details: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-in-illumination-our-lady-of-guadalupe-tickets-44388817147

Canory Building (The building behind St. John Cantius Rectory)

Come join us as we illuminate The Woman clothed with the sun and the moon under her feat!

We will focus on the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe that appeared on the tilma of Juan Diego. Her image is surrounded by a border of Castilla Roses and silver milagros, coming in a variety of shapes such hearts, moons, angels, etc., brought to the South Americas by the Spanish. These were placed on altars for votive oerings and healing. In this week-long workshop we will hand-grind pigments to make tempera, the paint used by the medieval illuminators to craft the beautiful illuminated pages in the Books of Hours. Techniques such as color mixing, raising and shadowing garments, glazing for painting face and hands, ora & fauna will be taught along with various methods of gilding including, raised and burnished gold, making our own liquid 23kt gold and gilding with palladium and silver alum. We will also discuss gesture as language and the image as codex: how Our Lady of Guadalupe used these powerful tools to set an extraordinary example of enculturation thereby creating a way to communicate to the Indians in the New World as far back as 1553 when she appeared to St. Juan Diego, and, how Our Lady of Guadalupe continues to become an important part of the new evangelization in our day of which John Paul II spoke about.

Workshop will include all art supplies such as brushes, pigments, binders, parchment, etc.

Traditional Miniature Materials & Techniques Covered in the Class:
• Making a binder
• Grinding pigments to make tempera
• Raised, burnished and tooled gold
• Making liquid gold from 23k powder gold

• Raised and burnished palladium
• The Golden Grisaille technique
• Color mixing techniques
• Transferring intricate designs for painting in gold

• Raising the garments: painting and floating the garment base colors, building up the shadows through
glazes and highlighting the folds.
• Inverse embroidery technique.
• Rendering the face through techniques of delicate stipple washes interlaced with “white glazes” create a
sfumato effect
• Outlining techniques

Enrollment is open to members and nonmembers. No experience necessary.

If you are an artist and are accustomed to using a lamp, such as an OTT light or similar task lamp, please fell free to bring one. Also since we are doing miniature painting with tiny details you may wish you can bring a magnifier such as the gooseneck style that sits on the desk or a the head-visor type...whatever you are comfortable with. While its not necessary it can be a great help. All other materials will be provided by the instructor.

Only 12 Spaces Available

*This workshop includes the use real gold and palladium, the cost of which is variable and has risen in the past 12 months.

Parking: Ample parking for the workshop is available on the church property, both behind the church are the spaces in front of the rectory, on the church property. Street parking is also available but check and obey the signs or you will be ticketed. Parking tickets are not the responsiblity of the Catholic Art Guild or St. John Cantius parish.

Refunds are available until July 8, 2018.

Mark Nowakowski: “Quality and the Discernment of an authentic Catholic aesthetic”

Details:
Jul. 14, 11:00 am
More information: https://www.catholicartguild.org/speaker-series-mark-nowakowski

11:00 am, St. John Cantius Parish Hall

Synopsis: This talk will explore the "Quality and the Discernment of an authentic Catholic aesthetic" as a key component professional and spiritual pursuit. Topics covered will include:

*Is there an authentic Catholic aesthetic? (Short answer: Yes, though it is a range of aesthetics, both conservative in scope from the outside yet incredibly wide and potent from the inside).

*Is quality a matter of opinion, or can it be known? (Both: we can square the idea of "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" equally with "Beauty is Truth.")

*How to speak to non-artists or artists overly influenced by modernism or populism? (How to maintain and insist on a higher standard in keeping with our calling as Catholic artists).

*How does one discern quality in their own work? (The ongoing process of a Catholic-centered development of taste, and how this can be balanced with our artistic nature and our desire to truly "push forward" in certain kinds of work).

*How does one discern quality in the life of the Church? (Liturgical vs. non-liturgical sacred works).

*How does an artist, patron, or fan of the arts undertake the process of discernment?

*The soul-deadening morass of modernism and populism, and how to use aesthetic fasting to 'reset' the spiritual-aesthetic filter God gave us.

​Bio: Mark Nowakowski is a composer whose works represent a modern merger of bold expressionism and mystical contemplation, Slavic pathos and American individualism. His work has been commissioned and performed globally by such notables as the Kronos Quartet, the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, The Monteverdi Cello Octet, The Voxare Quartet, the FiveOne Experimental Orchestra, Three Notch’d Road, Stowarzyszenia Mozart, Vox Musica of Sacramento, the Choir of the Shrine of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, and the Cracow Brass Quintet. His debut album on Naxos, “Blood, Forgotten” was praised by Gramophone Magazine for its “intense emotional worlds” with “writing that is at once fierce, haunting, and mystical“, while evoking “dramatic and pscyhological atmospheres as if Bartok and Shostakovich were looking over shoulder, but with his own sense of urgency, rhythm, and color.” Reviewer David Denton writes that “Mark Nowakowski has positioned himself among the cutting-edge composers” with this album release.

The son of Polish immigrants, Mark’s music derives a great deal of its experiential and aesthetic influence from his bicultural experience. Philosophically and spiritually, he is deeply influenced by the long history of Catholic mysticism, and is always seeking the transcendent element in all of his work.

In 2011, the Kronos Quartet premiered his “String Quartet #2: Grandfather Songs” at the International Festival of Polish Music in Krakow. In 2012, he was the composer in residence for Projekt Mozart, seeing his “O Pieknosci Niestworzona” premiered in a concert tour of seven Polish cities culminating in Czestochowa and Warsaw. In 2008, he served as the Composer in Residence for the Canton Symphony Orchestra. He is a member of “Multimode Filter,” an electronic music composer collaboration. Mark is also the music curator for the Foundation for Sacred Arts. His writings have been published in Sacred Music Journal and at newmusicbox.org, while his columns on new music and music technology regularly appear in the Communities Digital News.

Mark received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Maryland, where he also won the biennial Walsum Award for Excellence in Music Composition. He holds a Professional Studies degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music, where he was Assistant Director of the CIM New Music Festival and was awarded the Donald Erb Prize in Composition. He holds his Masters from the University of Colorado, and two undergraduate degrees from Illinois State University where he graduated with honors in both Music Theory and Arts Technology. His main composition teachers include Paul Schoenfield, Daniel Kellogg, Mark Wilson, Margaret Brouwer, Larry Moss, Steven Taylor, John Drumheller, and Michael Theodore. He has taught at the University of Maryland, Christendom College, Benedictine University, and DuPage College of Illinois, and currently serves on the faculty of music at Kent State Stark. http://www.marknowakowski.com/

Fatima Rosary Procession

Tridentine Low Mass followed by an outdoor Rosary Procession

Details:
Jul. 11, 7:30 pm


From May to October, St. John Cantius parish has a procession in honor of Our Lady of Fatima on the 2nd Wednesday. This commemorates Our Lady of Fatima's apparitions on the 13th of each month.

The procession, begins after the usual Wednesday 7:30pm Mass and ends with chanted Compline (Night Prayer). All parishioners and visitors are welcome to attend.

Men are needed to carry the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in procession. Please come to the sacristy to ask for details.

Learn more about the story of Our Lady of Fatima here »

France and America: “The Old World Meets the New” (Organ Recital of Zaccheus Lock)

Details:
Jul. 1, 3:00 pm
ABOUT THIS CONCERT

In this program, organist Zacchaeus Lock will explore some of the great works in the French and American traditions. While the music of France might at times be characterized by its tradition and restraint, some French composers have certainly eschewed such processes, opting instead for a courageous musical individualism similar to that found in the music of many American composers. Gospel tunes and Gregorian Chant will collide in an entertaining program of 19th and 20h century music, including works of Langlais, Bolcom, and Lefebure-Wely.

BIOGRAPHY

Zacchaeus Lock, winner of the 2017 AGO Pittsburgh Chapter Quimby Regional Competition for Young Organists, is music director and organist at St. Anthony's Church in Follansbee, West Virginia. Having completed his undergraduate study at Franciscan University of Steubenville with Nicholas Will and Dr. Jessica Ewell, studying both philosophy and sacred music, he has in past years played for numerous churches of all sorts and sizes in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, and Connecticut, along with a memorable stint as organ scholar at Calvary Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, working with Dr. Alan Lewis. As an alumnus of the St. Mary's Student Schola (directed by David Hughes and Charles Weaver) Zacchaeus sang for thousands at World Youth Day 2011 in Madrid as well as at events in New York City, Boston, and elsewhere; his experience working with professional ensembles under such diverse directorship as Scott Turkington, Chris Mueller, and Wilko Brouwers influences the hands-on choral work he does today.

REPERTOIRE

- Toccata on "O Filii et Filiae" - Lynnwood Farnam
- Prélude, Fugue, et Variation - César Franck
- Bolero de Concert - Louis-James-Alfred Lefebure-Wely
- Five Preludes on Plainchant Melodies - #4 "Ave Maris Stella" - Healey Willan
- 12 Gospel Preludes #1 - "What a Friend We Have in Jesus" - William Bolcom
- 3 Gregorian Paraphrases - #3 "Hymne d'action de grace "Te Deum"" - Jean Langlais
- Postlude pour l'office de Complies - Jehan Alain
- Variations on "America" - Charles Ives
- L'Ascension #1 "Majeste du Christ demandant sa gloire a son Pere" - Olivier Messiaen
- Sonata #1 (First Movement) - Paul Hindemith
- Offertoire sur "O Filii" - Félix-Alexandre Guilmant

TICKETS

$15 - adult
$10 - senior over 65
$10 - student
$5 - youth 6-18 years

Tickets are available at the door.

Second Annual Saint John’s Ball

Details:
Jun. 29, 8:00 pm
Where will you be on Friday, June 29th? Once again, young men and women from the Chicago area will meet and mingle during a night of music, dancing, wine and laughter.

St. John's Ball

As Chicagoans celebrate the weekend at bars and street festivals, hundreds of young adults will gather for 'St. John's Eve' at Chicago's lakeshore with a traditional Ball, the second annual Saint John's Ball, experiencing the grandeur of a bygone era.

Building on the success of last year's inaugural Ball (see article in Regina Magazine), we are excited to showcase a 30-piece orchestra and a larger venue which features an even more spacious dance floor. This year's venue is the historic South Shore Cultural Center, a Chicago landmark built in 1916 on the lakefront.


The first ever St. John's Ball was a grand success.



The Ball, held near the midsummer solstice, in honor of the feast of St. John the Baptist, joins in the long tradition of lively evening celebrations where historically Catholic cultures would commemorate "St. John's Eve". They would have bonfires or other festivities to mark the day with the longest available daylight. The coming shortening of days mirrored St. John the Baptist's own words, "He must increase, but I must decrease." The Ball will be a celebration filled with elegance, grandeur, and chivalry.

St. Johns Ball Chicago


The ticket price includes not only admission to the ball, but complimentary dance lessons, wine, and hors d'oeuvres. Dance lessons begin at 8pm, and the Ball kicks off at 9pm on Friday, June 29th. In addition, there will be free dance lessons in waltz and polka leading up to the Ball. These will be held at St. John Cantius' Church on select Sundays.

These events are hosted by Quo Vadis Young Adults from St. John Cantius Church, a parish community that is well known for its story of renaissance. WFMT, Chicago’s premiere classical radio station, says, "St John Cantius Church has established itself as a cultural hub in the Chicago area."

Please join us as we revive the elegance of a bygone era! Floor length gowns, satin gloves, and black ties will abound as St. John's Ball promises to be the event of the summer.

Click here to purchase tickets today as space is limited!

This program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency.

“French Reverence” - Gargoyle Brass & Organ Concert

Details:
Jun. 24, 3:00 pm


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Program



Marcel Dupré:Poème héroïque
Marcel Dupré:Symphony-Passion
Maurice Ravel:Pavane for a Dead Princess, arr. Craig Garner.
Alexandre Guilmant: Symphony No. 1, Op. 42, arr. Craig Garner
Healey Willan: "How They So Softly Rest," arr. Craig Garner.

Performers



Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble
Corrado Cavalli, organist
Jonathan Rudy, organist
Stephen Squires, conductor

Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble: "French Reverence"



For its season finale, the Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble celebrates French music of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in a one-time-only concert that features, as guest artists, the esteemed resident organists of St. John Cantius Church performing on a historic instrument ideally suited to the repertoire. Highlights include Gargoyle-commissioned arrangements of Alexandre Guilmant's colorful, power-packed Symphony No. 1, Op. 42, and Maurce Ravel's popularPavane for a Dead Princess, which evokes dance music of Renaissance Spain.

“The Chicago Gargoyle Brass and Organ Ensemble plays with warmth, elegance, and panache,” says Fanfare magazine. “[They] are perfect companions for the music lover in need of calming nourishment.”

St. Cecilia Choir & Orchestra at 12:30 pm Mass

St. Cecilia Choir and Orchestra

Details:
Jun. 24, 12:30 pm  -  Feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist


Missa Brevis in F, K. 192, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Scande coeli limina, KV 34, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Alma Dei Creatoris, KV 277, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)



Inter natos mulierum, K 72, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)


Anthony Visco Presents “His Name is John”

Details:
Jun. 23, 11:00 am
Catholic Art Guild


"His Name is John"
The Life of St. John the Baptist in Art

Anthony Visco

Saturday, June 23rd at 11:00 am
St. John Cantius Parish Hall


$5 suggested donation. Coffee and donuts will be provided.
This event is open to non-members & members so bring your friends!


RSVP on Facebook »

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In all of Christendom, other than Christ Jesus, there is no other man portrayed as much as The Forerunner, Saint John the Baptist. This June 23rd we will be celebrating the Solemnity of the Birth of the Baptist with a special vigil lecture on his life in art. This is part of the ongoing Catholic Art Guild speaker series.

Come join us with guest lecturer Anthony Visco as we take time to review and contemplate how the episodes of the Baptist’s life generated so much work for so many centuries and where we are today in our art of the Baptist.

Anthony Visco, director of the Atelier for the Sacred Arts, graduated from the University of the Arts, where he received a Fullbright to travel and study in Florence. In 1975, he was awarded the Elizabeth T. Greensheilds Grant for figurative sculpture and has received the Arthur Ross Award twice for sculpture such as his triptych reliefs at the Catherine Pew Memorial Chapel and The Stations of the Cross at St. Joseph Church in Philadelphia. He has taught at Penn. Academy of the Fine Arts as well as New York Academy of Art. Visco’s sculptures, murals, and reliefs adorn several sacred spaces all over the country.